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Jan 28

Chapter 2 – part 1: The Heart of the Destroyer

It’s been months.

naveen Chapter 2   part 1: The Heart of the Destroyer

It has been months since I could open this diary and write a few words. So many things has happened… So many events changed our group. It isn’t just Vainard and I anymore. It isn’t just humans, anymore. I have so many things to tell, I want to write so many things at a time, that I do not know where to start. Should I start by saying that I’m not so ignorant anymore? Could it be that I’m less naive about the world? It is such a hard thing to do to start explaining using the right words. So instead, I will just begin with how I have left it last time and, hopefully, I will be able to remember everything like it was and tell you how it went.

Boxxa, the constantly bragging asura, had just saved us from impending doom. Vainard and I were on a troll hunt and we were in over our heads in trouble. Out of nowhere, she popped with her glue guns, her grenades and flame throwers and saved us from death. Vainard only had eyes for her skills and I, on the other hand, was mildly thankful. It would have been nice if she wouldn’t have spread it all over our faces, too. She was constantly reminding us of how ignorant it had been to have entered this cave with just the two of us and a wolf. Halfear didn’t seem to care for the asura and was scanning the surroundings for more dangers, as usual. Boxxa, on the other hand, kept bragging about her skills. I didn’t really like asuras. They are snarky, sarcastic and way over their heads little creatures. That, and their sharp teeth creep me out.

I’m Naveen. Thanks… For helping us.

Boxxa rose a brow. “Helping? I SAVED you! And that’s why now you owe me one. Which is excellent because I am gathering a Krewe.” I frowned a little.

What for?” I asked, knowing all too well that when asuras formed Krewes, it was for their own benefits only.

I’m going for the Heart of the Destroyer” she said. “But first, you really need a bath. Troll Saliva’s not in fashion I hear.

With that, without any consultation, we were on our way to Lion’s Arch to gather a bigger Krewe to get this Heart of the Destroyer. I didn’t know what it was. I didn’t know what it did. All I knew was that Vainard seemed so excited about finally finding adventure that I didn’t ask any questions. I followed silently and surprised myself in doing something I had not done in a long while, if ever; I was suspicious about the asura and so I was studying her. The way she clumsily walked, the way her right hand would always fiddle with something inside her jacket’s pocket… Why did she save us? Only to gather more people for her Krewe? Something didn’t add up. Vainard didn’t seem to be bothered by this but there was something I couldn’t shake off. It was the first time in a very long time that I would find myself silent, careful, serious and on edge about everything.

As we reached Lion’s Arch and its humid climate, Boxxa’s first intention was to find a room. Shelter, as it was, but she called it “Headquarters”. A place where we could meet and discuss about the current strategies in our attempt in finding the Heart of the Destroyer. As we were making our way to a nearby Inn, my eyes wandered around the city; houses made of boat wreckage, diversity in races and oh so many merchants. Everywhere you go in Lion’s Arch a merchant is waiting for you to look at their weapons or even are yelling about how fresh their foods are. It’s magical to see everyone living together in such respectful manner. I learned that day that Lion’s Arch is the center of this new generation. Charr cubs and human children playing together, Norn and Sylvari discussing about hunts and wyld hunts. All are welcome as long as peace is kept between parties. I did not think there was a single place in Tyria where all races would get together and be friendly to each other, but I could see then that I was wrong.

In Divinity’s Reach, especially in the noble’s quarters, living in harmony with other races is a subject not spoken of. We see Sylvari, sometimes even Charr, but none really stay in the city for too long because it is the pride of the human race. Just like you wouldn’t see a human live in the Black Citadel unless they wanted to become prey themselves. So I was not accustomed to seeing such things happen and, well, I was staring sometimes, and it was embarrassing to someone in particular.

“You’d think she’d never seen this city,” Boxxa said as she noticed me staring.

Vainard shrugged and entered the establishment we would later call our headquarters, saying “Leave the girl be. She’s never been here!”

Even though he was right, it was something I didn’t want him to share because from that day on, it was something Boxxa would remind me so very often. The fact that I was born and raised in Divinity’s Reach, never to go outside of its walls, was strange to her. She couldn’t imagine the city being so big that I would never feel enclosed, trapped in. I had never felt that way. Divinity’s Reach is wide and high, big and beautiful.

As we entered the Inn, Vainard was already reserving our room. One big enough that would hold at least four beds and a round table for our discussions. Already, I wasn’t liking the fact that this was forced upon me. Vainard had not talked to me about anything. He had never consulted me about anything. Perhaps I had no interest! Maybe I couldn’t care less about this asura or her plans! I would look at him and feel rage rising inside me. I could have walked away, but Vainard was mine, not hers, and by mine, I really mean that he is my friend.

We had lunch and then dinner. We drank, they laughed, I sulked and still remained silent. When it was time for bed, we all fell asleep pretty quickly. I am pretty sure the ale imported to Lion’s Arch is from the Shiverpeaks because it got to us pretty quickly. I have no clue how long I had been sleeping for but it was already dark and cold in the establishment when Vainard woke me up with a hand on my mouth and a finger to his own lips signaling me to stay silent. I listened and stood up, then walked with him outside of the room. The hallway was dark, every guests were asleep and you could only hear the creatures of the night singing their songs until the sun would come up. That and the waves softly crashing on the beach nearby.

“I know you’re not happy about the asura,” he started, his face close to mine so we could see each other’s eyes in the dark. “You’ve got to start having interest, or else she’ll push you out of the Krewe.”

I wasn’t sure why he wanted to stay with her to begin with.

“Then we just leave her. I don’t like her and I couldn’t care less about the item she’s looking for,” I angrily replied, yet low enough that only the two of us could hear.

“We can’t do that, Naveen.” He looked very serious. Now I was intrigued.

“Why not?” I asked after a few seconds.

“The heart of the destroyer is an item worth a lot of gold,” he started, and I thought to myself “Why is he so greedy?” but after his explanation, I understood.

He told me about this heart, which wasn’t a heart at all but rather a piece of destroyer shell that was imbued with magical powers when the Elder Dragons awoke. There was only one like it and it could be used for many things; crafting indestructible weapons, armors or even trinkets. The one thing it could also be used as was a spell. A spell so dark it could change the face of the world, or so it was told. It could have been a legend and it could have been real, but if one tiny asura could get it, it could even be used for things never been dealt with before. Rata Sum is proof that the energy the asura use can be powerful, so imagine if her hands would fall on this Heart

“We can’t let that happen,” he started, his warm hands now grabbing my naked shoulders. His look was fierce and you could tell that he was extremely serious about his choice of words. “If she finds the heart, we have to kill her.”