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Oct 16

Ascalon and Charr history

A map of Tyria
Madness, clocktower and tombstones.

Welcome back adventurers!

While running around Tyria, you may have stumbled upon a few of these slabs. Mainly floating above fires or randomly scattered around the world in Durmand Priory carts. Those slabs were highly damaged through time which renders the translation of the whole text impossible. In this particular article, I have translated a slab about the Foefire and another one telling the story of Kalla Schorchrazor.

 

The fall of Ascalon

History tells us that Ascalon city fell in the year 1090 AE. However, that date does not mark the end of the tale of Ascalon, but the beginning of an even darker chapter.

Besieged by overwhelming charr forces , King Adelbern , last king of ascalon, destroyed his sword, Magdaer, thus unleashing the foefire, which swept through the city (…) the king’s (….) cursing his (…)

Foefire

 

The charr rebellion

The story of Kalla Scorchrazor and the charr rebellion against the shaman caste has been told many times.

Kalla Schorchrazor

Most historians have studied the battle of the plains of Golgheim [sic], and how Kalla’s female warriors,  trained in secret for a generation or more, dealt a decisive blow to the gold legion.

However,  many often forget that the rebellion began some forty years earlier when Kalla’s grandfather Pyre Fierceshot …

Pyre Fierceshot

Stay tuned for next week’s translations about  a translations that was widely talked about makes a comeback.

Special thanks to Alucardalina for sending us excellent screenshots of these tablets.

If you have some screenshots waiting to be deciphered, please send them to signs@chroniclesoftyria.com!

A map of Tyria
Madness, clocktower and tombstones.

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  1. This week in Guild Wars 2 | Guild Wars 2 Editorials, Magazine, Media & Podcast | GuildMag

    […] Chronicles of Tyria — Ascalon and Charr history. “Welcome back adventurers! While running around Tyria, you may have stumbled upon a few of these slabs. Mainly floating above fires or randomly scattered around the world in Durmand Priory carts. Those slabs were highly damaged through time which renders the translation of the whole text impossible.” […]

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